Aristotles concept of catharsis

Aristotle speaks of this tragic pleasure in two ways as the pleasure of mimesis, and as the pleasure of catharsis if we come to understand the aristotelian concept of pleasure as an activity as opposed to a process, and the distinction between essential and accidental pleasures, we can better understand the source of aristotle’s tragic . The concept of catharsis as aristotle and freud suggested it and developed it into a new psychotherapeutic modality reenacting scenes from one’s past, dreams, or fantasies helps the. Stimulation interpretations of aristotle’s concepts of catharsis and tragic pleasure are off the mark in response, lear defends an anti-cognitivist account, arguing that it. Three key concepts are introduced in this section - reversal, recognition, and catharsis (though aristotle refers to the last as 'purgation') a simple tragedy will have none of these elements (or a perfunctory catharsis), but a complex tragedy will use reversal and recognition to achieve catharsis. Aristotle's concept of catharsis aristotle writes that the function of tragedy is to arouse the emotions of pity and fear, and to affect the katharsis of these .

Aristotle’s concept of catharsis introduction catharsis is the emotional cleansing of the audience or characters in the play in relation to drama, it is an extreme change in emotion resulting from strong feelings of sorrow, fear, pity and laughter, this result has been described as purification . The term ‘catharsis’, for instance, has been interpreted so variously that it is difficult to come to an agreement as to what aristotle really meant of the theories advanced to explain catharsis, the clarification theory appears to be the most acceptable, perhaps, for it tends to relate catharsis to the psychology of the audience. According to aristotle, a tragedy must be an imitation of life in the form of a serious story that is complete in itself in other words, the story must be realistic and narrow in focus a good tragedy will evoke pity and fear in its viewers, causing the viewers to experience a feeling of catharsis.

Aristotle frequently asserts that tragedies are the only form capable of generating pity and fear, which, sequentially, is the only way the purgation, or catharsis, of an audience can manifest (the poetics of aristotle 10). The terms catharsis occurs in aristotle‟s definition of tragedy: “tragedy is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude in the form of action, not of narrative through pity and fear affecting the proper catharsis, or purgation of. Catharsis aristotle describes catharsis as the purging of the emotions of pity and fear that are aroused in the viewer of a tragedy debate continues about what aristotle actually means by catharsis, but the concept is linked to the positive social function of tragedy.

‘catharsis’ in aristotle’s poetics catharsis is a metaphor used by aristotle in the poetics to describe the effects of true tragedy on the spectator the use is derived from the medical term katharsis (greek: “purgation” or “purification”) aristotle states that the purpose of tragedy . One theory is that, instead of purging the audience's emotions, byron found a way to initiate his own very personal catharsis by writing about himself and his 'issues'. In chapter 6 the poetics, aristotle discusses briefly the concept of “catharsis”this is the only time in the poetics that the term is mentioned, yet there is still on-going contention about its significance and meaning in tragic drama. Resulted in a plethora of interpretations of aristotles concept of catharsis today, three broad interpretations of these different versions of tragic catharsis have emerged. As aristotle has given the definition of tragedy in his book poetics: a tragedy, then, is the imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magintude, complete in itself: in aristotle's concept of tragedy - css forums.

Originally, the term was used as a metaphor in poetics by aristotle, to explain the impact of tragedy on the audiences he believed that catharsis was the ultimate end of a tragic artistic work, and that it marked its quality. The clarification theory of catharsis would be fully consistent, as other interpretations are not, with aristotle's argument in chapter 4 of the poetics (1448b4-17) that the essential pleasure of mimesis is the intellectual pleasure of learning and inference. The word catharsis drops out of the poetics because the word wonder, to rhaumaston, replaces it, first in chapter 9, where aristotle argues that pity and fear arise most of all where wonder does, and finally in chapters 24 and 25, where he singles out wonder as the aim of the poetic art itself, into which the aim of tragedy in particular merges .

Aristotles concept of catharsis

aristotles concept of catharsis Catharsis was first linked to drama, especially to tragedy, by the greek philosopher aristotle the theory was that, through viewing tragedy, people learned to display emotions at a proper amount and lessen excessive outbursts of emotion in daily life.

Catharsis theory did not die with aristotle and freud many directors and producers of violent media claim that their products are cathartic for example, alfred hitchcock, director of the movie psycho, said, one of television's greatest contributions is that it brought murder back into the home where it belongs. Get an answer for 'critically examine the aristotelian concept of catharsis' and find homework help for other aristotle questions at enotes. Aristotle's concept of catharsis aristotle writes that the function of tragedy is to arouse the emotions of pity and fear, and to affect the katharsis of these emotions aristotle has used the term katharsis only once, but no phrase has been handled so frequently by critics, and poets. Abstract: aristotle writes the poetics as an investigation into representational art and, more specifically, as an investigation into the art form of tragedy while aristotle goes into great detail regarding the technical aspects of creating and appreciating a work of tragedy, he is somewhat lacking .

  • His theory of catharsis consists in the purgation or purification of the excessive emotions of pity and fear witnessing the tragedy and suffering of the protagonist on the stage, such emotions and feelings of the audience are purged.
  • Aristotle’s theory of imitation aristotle’s term “imitation” plato was the first to use the word in relation to poetry, but aristotle in a specific sense breathed again imitation is no longer considered poetic imitation, but is considered an act of imaginative creation in which the poet drew his material from the world of phenomena .
  • Aristotle's poetics: catharsis and rasas essay an analysis of hamlet under aristotle’s theory on tragedy aristotle, as a world famous philosopher, gives a .

This concept is vital to the further investigation into the source of aristotle’s tragic pleasure, how it relates to mimesis and catharsis, and the relationship, if any, between mimesis and catharsis. Aristotle emphasizes that the function of tragedy is to present scenes of “fear and pity” and create a catharsis of these emotions suffice it to say that the catharsis of pity and fear, he believes their return to the right proportions as the desired “golden means”. One of the most difficult concepts introduced in the poetics is catharsis, a word which has come into everyday language even though scholars are still debating its actual meaning in aristotle's text catharsis is most often defined as the purging of the emotions of pity and fear that occurs when we watch a tragedy. Catharsis and pleasure if we accept aristotle’s definition of catharsis as a purging of emotions and agree that he would not have believed that catharsis was a form of education, we can now turn our attention to how catharsis is pleasurable.

aristotles concept of catharsis Catharsis was first linked to drama, especially to tragedy, by the greek philosopher aristotle the theory was that, through viewing tragedy, people learned to display emotions at a proper amount and lessen excessive outbursts of emotion in daily life.
Aristotles concept of catharsis
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